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Postconditioning: Current Controversies and Clinical Implications

Mockford, KA; Girn, HRS; Homer-Vanniasinkam, S; (2009) Postconditioning: Current Controversies and Clinical Implications. EUR J VASC ENDOVASC , 37 (4) 437 - 442. 10.1016/j.ejvs.2008.12.017.

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Abstract

Objectives: Postconditioning of ischaemic tissue, via mechanical or pharmacological manipulation, offers an exciting avenue towards amelioration of ischaemia-reperfusion injury. Born from the concept of ischaemic preconditioning, postconditioning is advantageous in that prior knowledge of the ischaemic insult is not required, and thus clinical translation may be further reaching. This review explores the current evidence and controversies in both animal and human studies and multiple organ systems.Methods: A Medline search was conducted to identify English-language articles with 'postconditioning' as a keyword. Two independent researchers scrutinised the literature search for potentially relevant articles. Reference lists from selected articles were manually searched for further relevant articles.Results and conclusions: Postconditioning has been shown to be successful in reducing ischaemia-reperfusion injury in both animal models and clinical trials. Human studies are presently limited to cardiac studies, but there is scope for research into other organ systems with potential beneficial effects, particularly within the field of vascular surgery where ischaemia-reperfusion occurs by nature of both - the disease and the intervention. (C) 2009 European Society for Vascular Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Type:Article
Title:Postconditioning: Current Controversies and Clinical Implications
DOI:10.1016/j.ejvs.2008.12.017
Keywords:Ischaemic preconditioning, Postconditioning, Reperfusion injury, MITOCHONDRIAL PERMEABILITY TRANSITION, ISCHEMIA-REPERFUSION INJURY, ACUTE MYOCARDIAL-INFARCTION, K-ATP-CHANNELS, VALVE-REPLACEMENT, HUMAN HEART, CARDIOPROTECTION, ADENOSINE, PROTECTS, RABBITS
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Surgery and Interventional Science (Division of)

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