UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Do users always know what's good for them? Utilising physiological responses to assess media quality

Wilson, GM; Sasse, MA; (2000) Do users always know what's good for them? Utilising physiological responses to assess media quality. In: McDonald, S and Waern, Y and Cockton, G, (eds.) PEOPLE AND COMPUTERS XIV - USABILITY OR ELSE! (pp. 327 - 339). SPRINGER-VERLAG LONDON LTD

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

Subjective methods are widely used to determine whether audio and video quality in networked multimedia applications is sufficient. Recent findings suggest that, due to contextual factors, users often accept levels of media quality known to be below the threshold required for such tasks. Therefore, we propose the use of physiological methods to assess the user cost of different levels of media quality. Physiological responses (HR, GSR and BVP) to two levels of video quality (5 vs. 25 frames per second - fps) were measured in a study with 24 users. Results showed that there was a statistically significant effect of frame rate, in the direction that 5fps caused responses to indicate stress. However, only 16 % of the users noticed the difference subjectively. We propose a 3-tier assessment method that combines task performance, user satisfaction and user cost to obtain a meaningful indication of the media quality required by users.

Type:Proceedings paper
Title:Do users always know what's good for them? Utilising physiological responses to assess media quality
Event:Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction Topics (HCI 2000)
Location:SUNDERLAND UNIV, SUNDERLAND, ENGLAND
Dates:2000-09
ISBN:1-85233-318-9
Keywords:evaluation methods, empirical evaluation, subjective assessment, user cost, audio, video, videoconferencing, physiological measurements
UCL classification:UCL > School of BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Computer Science

Archive Staff Only: edit this record