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Genealogical hybridities: the making and unmaking of blood relatives and predictive knowledge in breast cancer genetics

Gibbon, S.; (2007) Genealogical hybridities: the making and unmaking of blood relatives and predictive knowledge in breast cancer genetics. In: Edwards, J. and Harvey, P. and Wade, P., (eds.) Anthropology and science: epistemologies in practice. (pp. 133-153). Berg Publishers: Oxford, UK.

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Abstract

Book description: What does it mean to know something - scientifically, anthropologically, socially? What is the relationship between different forms of knowledge and ways of knowing? How is knowledge mobilised in society and to what ends? Drawing on ethnographic examples from across the world, and from the virtual and global 'places' created by new information technologies, Anthropology and Science presents examples of living and dynamic epistemologies and practices, and of how scientific ways of knowing operate in the world. Authors address the nature of both scientific and experiential knowledge, and look at competing and alternative ideas about what it means to be human. The essays analyze the politics and ethics of positioning 'science', 'culture' or 'society' as authoritative. They explore how certain modes of knowing are made authoritative and command allegiance (or not), and look at scientific and other rationalities - whether these challenge or are compatible with science.

Type:Book chapter
Title:Genealogical hybridities: the making and unmaking of blood relatives and predictive knowledge in breast cancer genetics
ISBN-13:9781845204990
Publisher version:http://www.bergpublishers.com/?tabid=1195
Language:English
UCL classification:UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences > Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences > Anthropology

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