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Temporal heterogeneity in the study of African land use: Interdisciplinary collaboration between anthropology, human geography and remote sensing

Guyer, JI; Lambin, EF; Cliggett, L; Walker, P; Amanor, K; Bassett, T; ... Unruh, J; + view all (2007) Temporal heterogeneity in the study of African land use: Interdisciplinary collaboration between anthropology, human geography and remote sensing. Human Ecology , 35 (1) 3 - 17. 10.1007/s10745-006-9085-2.

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Abstract

This paper introduces a set of four collaborative papers exploring temporal heterogeneity in the analysis of African land use over a decadal time period, from 10 to 50 years, in the second half of the twentieth century. The four cases were chosen amongst the seven teams of anthropologists, human geographers and remote sensing specialists who had carried out long-term research and who met to discuss their findings at a workshop in 2003. All seven teams' work and the collective discussion'on Casamance (Senegal), Brong Ahafo (Ghana), Southern Niger/ Northern Cote d'Ivoire, Oyo State (Nigeria), Maasai Mara (Kenya and Tanzania), Gwembe (Zambia), and Malawi - inform this introduction. We identify several temporal processes in all the cases, each operating on its own temporal frame: population growth and, above all, mobility; livelihood change through crop and occupational change; tenure ambiguity; powerful though "punctuated" interventions by state policy; and climate change. Conceptual and methodological implications are disussed. © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

Type:Article
Title:Temporal heterogeneity in the study of African land use: Interdisciplinary collaboration between anthropology, human geography and remote sensing
DOI:10.1007/s10745-006-9085-2
UCL classification:UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences > Faculty of Social and Historical Sciences > Anthropology

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