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The postnatal development of spinal sensory processing

Fitzgerald, M; Jennings, E; (1999) The postnatal development of spinal sensory processing. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA , 96 (14) 7719 - 7722.

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Abstract

The mechanisms by which infants and children process pain should be viewed within the context of a developing sensory nervous system. The study of the neurophysiological properties and connectivity of sensory neurons in the developing spinal cord dorsal horn of the intact postnatal rat has shed light on the way in which the newborn central nervous system analyzes cutaneous innocuous and noxious stimuli. The receptive field properties and evoked activity of newborn dorsal horn cells to single repetitive and persistent innocuous and noxious inputs are developmentally regulated and reflect the maturation of excitatory transmission within the spinal cord. These changes will have an important influence on pain processing in the postnatal period.

Type: Article
Title: The postnatal development of spinal sensory processing
Location: IRVINE, CA
Keywords: PRIMARY AFFERENT-FIBERS, RAT DORSAL HORN, NEONATAL RAT, SUBSTANTIA-GELATINOSA, INDUCED INFLAMMATION, INDUCED HYPERALGESIA, THERMAL NOCICEPTION, RECEPTIVE-FIELDS, FLEXOR REFLEX, NEWBORN RAT
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/121705
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