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Cutaneous hypersensitivity following peripheral tissue damage in newborn infants and its reversal with topical anaesthesia.

Fitzgerald, M; Millard, C; McIntosh, N; (1989) Cutaneous hypersensitivity following peripheral tissue damage in newborn infants and its reversal with topical anaesthesia. Pain , 39 (1) pp. 31-36.

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Abstract

The flexion reflex threshold has been used as a measure of sensation in a group of premature infants born at 27-32 weeks postmenstrual age. The threshold in an area of local tissue damage created by routine heel lances was half the threshold on the intact heel on the other side. This indicated a hypersensitivity to tissue damage analogous to tenderness or hyperalgesia reported in adults. In a double-blind study, treatment of the damaged area with the topical anaesthetic cream, EMLA, was found to reverse this hypersensitivity or in other words increase the flexion reflex threshold. Treatment with placebo had no effect. The results show that the newborn infant central nervous system is capable of mounting a chronic pain response to local injury which can be reduced by local anaesthetic.

Type: Article
Title: Cutaneous hypersensitivity following peripheral tissue damage in newborn infants and its reversal with topical anaesthesia.
Location: United States
Keywords: Anesthetics, Local, Ankle Injuries, Blood Specimen Collection, Double-Blind Method, Drug Combinations, Female, Humans, Hypersensitivity, Infant, Newborn, Lidocaine, Lidocaine, Prilocaine Drug Combination, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Prilocaine, Reflex, Sensory Thresholds, Skin Diseases, Wounds, Penetrating
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/121656
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