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Neonatal sciatic nerve section results in thiamine monophosphate but not substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide depletion from the terminal field in the dorsal horn of the rat: the role of collateral sprouting.

Reynolds, ML; Fitzgerald, M; (1992) Neonatal sciatic nerve section results in thiamine monophosphate but not substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide depletion from the terminal field in the dorsal horn of the rat: the role of collateral sprouting. Neuroscience , 51 (1) pp. 191-202. 10.1016/0306-4522(92)90484-j.

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Abstract

The expression of substance P, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and thiamine monophosphatase in the sciatic nerve terminal field of the lumbar dorsal horn of the rat was examined following neonatal sciatic nerve section and ligation. The total terminal field from L3 to L5 was mapped from semi-serial sections on the treated side and compared to equivalent maps on the contralateral intact side. To obtain a detailed time course of events, data were obtained 4, 7, 10, 15-20 and 40-60 days after sciatic nerve section. At 4-7 days thiamine monophosphate was depleted from the cut nerve terminals resulting in a gap in dorsal horn thiamine monophosphate stain similar to that seen after adult nerve section. In contrast, substance P and CGRP-containing terminals showed only a transient fall in expression in the first week following nerve section and then staining was no different from that seen on the control side. The depletion of peptides normally observed after adult nerve section did not occur. This phenomenon was only observed if the sciatic nerve was cut at birth. Nerve section at 10 days of age resulted in the same pattern of peptide depletion as is observed in the adult. A week after neonatal sciatic nerve section, thiamine monophosphate-containing nerve terminals from nearby intact nerves begin to sprout into the sciatic nerve territory in the dorsal horn. This, together with some recovery of thiamine monophosphate from the remaining sciatic terminals themselves, results in a slow filling in of the gap in the thiamine monophosphate stain. Resection of the cut sciatic nerve, together with adjacent intact nerves, re-establishes the depletion. Substance P and CGRP terminals from nearby intact nerves also sprout into the deafferented sciatic field and this can be demonstrated by the larger than normal area of depletion following section of these nerves when adult. Furthermore, resection of the neonatally cut sciatic nerve when adult also causes some depletion of substance P and CGRP within the sciatic field, indicating a degree of recovery or up-regulation of peptides in surviving cut afferents. However, even after resection of the cut sciatic nerve and nearby intact nerves, substance P and CGRP staining remained in the terminal region. We conclude that while central collateral sprouting does take place in both substance P and CGRP-containing afferents following peripheral nerve section, it cannot account for the lack of depletion of peptides observed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

Type: Article
Title: Neonatal sciatic nerve section results in thiamine monophosphate but not substance P or calcitonin gene-related peptide depletion from the terminal field in the dorsal horn of the rat: the role of collateral sprouting.
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1016/0306-4522(92)90484-j
Keywords: Aging, Animals, Animals, Newborn, Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide, Immunohistochemistry, Nerve Endings, Nerve Regeneration, Rats, Rats, Sprague-Dawley, Sciatic Nerve, Spinal Cord, Substance P, Thiamine Monophosphate
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/121644
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