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What do you think you're looking at? Investigating social cognition in young offenders

Jones, AP; Forster, AS; Skuse, D; (2007) What do you think you're looking at? Investigating social cognition in young offenders. Crim Behav Ment Health , 17 101 - 106. 10.1002/cbm.641.

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Abstract

AIM: This small study was designed to assess the nature and severity of social-cognitive deficits in antisocial adolescents. METHOD: Thirty-seven boys aged 15-18 from a Young Offenders Institute and Community College participated. They were asked to complete a test of general intellectual ability and self-rating of social competence as well as tasks from the Skuse Schedules for the Assessment of Social Intelligence. RESULTS: Young offenders were poor at recognizing the facial expression of anger, regardless of intellectual ability. They could not accurately identify the direction of another's eye gaze. Their performance on theory of mind tasks, however, was unimpaired. CONCLUSION: These preliminary findings imply selective impairment in the cognitive appraisal of threat, which may contribute to social maladjustment. Further such study of social cognition among young offenders is indicated.

Type: Article
Title: What do you think you're looking at? Investigating social cognition in young offenders
DOI: 10.1002/cbm.641
Additional information: Jones, Alice P Forster, Alice S Skuse, David eng England 2007/02/14 09:00 Crim Behav Ment Health. 2007;17(2):101-6. AIM: This small study was designed to assess the nature and severity of social-cognitive deficits in antisocial adolescents. METHOD: Thirty-seven boys aged 15-18 from a Young Offenders Institute and Community College participated. They were asked to complete a test of general intellectual ability and self-rating of social competence as well as tasks from the Skuse Schedules for the Assessment of Social Intelligence. RESULTS: Young offenders were poor at recognizing the facial expression of anger, regardless of intellectual ability. They could not accurately identify the direction of another's eye gaze. Their performance on theory of mind tasks, however, was unimpaired. CONCLUSION: These preliminary findings imply selective impairment in the cognitive appraisal of threat, which may contribute to social maladjustment. Further such study of social cognition among young offenders is indicated.
Keywords: Adolescent *Cognition Humans Intelligence Juvenile Delinquency/*psychology Male Multivariate Analysis Social Behavior Disorders/*psychology *Social Perception
UCL classification: UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > Epidemiology and Public Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/119567
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