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Selection conference

Sturrock, A; Collett, A; Sales, D; Spencer, H; Dacre, J; (2008) Selection conference. In: (Proceedings) ASME Conference on Recruitment and selection into Specialty Training: one year on.

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Abstract

Could an on-line clinical problem solving test help select candidates for Core Medical Training? ASME Conference presentation Introduction We will describe the development, implementation and evaluation of a Clinical Problem Solving (CPS) pilot, under-taken by a consortium headed by the Royal College of Physicians of London. It was funded by the DH via the MMC programme board to determine whether an on-line CPS test could help select candidates for Core Medical Training (CMT). Methods A 120 single best answer (SBA) paper was created, using clinical vignettes designed to test clinical problem solving. It was piloted during a 48-hour period in March 2008, to coincide with the London Deanery CMT short listing. All their applicants were invited to participate, while being advised that this would not alter their chances of being short-listed or selected for a training post. After completing the test, candidates were invited to provide feedback; e.g., whether it was a fair / appropriate / improved method of selecting CMT candidates. Results obtained were checked for collusion before being compared to the scores the candidate obtained during short listing. We also compared both methods of selection in terms of gender, ethnicity, country of primary qualification and age. Results 320 candidates logged on to take the test. Some failed to complete it, mostly due to technical problems. 222 candidates completed sufficient questions for their results to be meaningful. There was no evidence of cheating detected. There was a small correlation between the deanery ranking and CPS test result. (Spearman rank=0.33). Shortlisted candidates had a significantly higher score in the CPS test when compared to candidates not shortlisted. There was no significant difference in scores between gender and ethnicity. Candidates who did not qualify in the UK had significantly lower scores in both the CPS test and deanery ranking. When the country of qualification was accounted for, there was no significant difference in either CPS ranking or short- listing rank according to age. Candidate feedback was positive; the majority of candidates agreed or strongly agreed that this was a fair method of short listing and felt it was relevant with a good range of topics. Conclusion It would be feasible to hold an on-line clinical problem solving test as part of a CMT selection process – it would be time efficient, discriminatory as to candidates’ medical knowledge, non-discriminatory as regards age, gender and ethnicity and acceptable to candidates. If used for selection, it would have to be held in an invigilated test centre to ensure test integrity.

Type: Proceedings paper
Title: Selection conference
Event: ASME Conference on Recruitment and selection into Specialty Training: one year on
Dates: March 2008
Keywords: selection
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > UCL Medical School
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/118029
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