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Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle

Koltzenburg, M; Yousry, T; (2007) Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle. CURR OPIN NEUROL , 20 (5) 595 - 599.

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Abstract

Purpose of reviewClinical investigations of neuromuscular diseases routinely involve genetic, neurophysiological, biochemical and histopathological methods. More recently, various magnetic resonance imaging techniques have become available and extended the differential diagnostic possibilities.Recent findingsUsing magnetic resonance imaging it is now possible to quantify muscle volume in selected body regions and measure wasting and exercise-induced muscle hypertrophy. Evidence is forthcoming that many hereditary myopathies are characterized by distinct patterns of muscle degeneration and this helps in selecting other relevant genetic and biochemical investigations. With diffusion-weighted tensor imaging it is possible to identify the microstructure of normal and diseased muscles. Arterial spin labelling is an emerging non-invasive tool to assess blood-flow changes in individual muscles. Magnetic resonance spectroscopy now provides an exciting opportunity to visualize metabolic changes and the pathophysiologically relevant cellular perturbations in muscle channelopathies affecting the muscle-specific sodium-channel isoform Na-v 1.4.SummaryMagnetic resonance imaging supplements investigations for the differential diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases. An advantage over routine neurophysiological or histopathological methods is that they are operator-independent, non-invasive and painless. Magnetic resonance imaging also has the advantage of providing a lasting detailed topographical picture of regional variations and allows robust measurements of muscle volume and various functional parameters.

Type: Article
Title: Magnetic resonance imaging of skeletal muscle
Keywords: biomarker, channelopathy, muscle wasting, neurogenic changes of skeletal muscle, topographical investigations, INHERITED NEUROMUSCULAR DISORDERS, FOOT MUSCLES, MRI, DENERVATION, DIAGNOSIS, WEAKNESS, ATROPHY, LEG
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Brain Repair and Rehabilitation
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/116329
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