UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

FREEDOM OF INFORMATION: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR THE OMBUDSMAN

HAZELL, R; (1995) FREEDOM OF INFORMATION: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR THE OMBUDSMAN. Public Administration , 73 (2) pp. 263-270. 10.1111/j.1467-9299.1995.tb00827.x.

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract

In an article in Public Administration five years ago I reported on the operation of the new freedom of information laws in Australia, Canada and New Zealand (Hazell 1989). Despite these Commonwealth precedents, under Mrs Thatcher's premiership the British government maintained that freedom of information was incompatible with the Westminster system of ministerial accountability to Parliament. Under John Major that line has softened a bit, and last year the British government took an important step towards freedom of information, with the introduction of its new code of practice on open government. The code of practice will be policed by the Ombudsman; and this article considers the implications of this novel extension to his jurisdiction. Copyright © 1995, Wiley Blackwell. All rights reserved

Type: Article
Title: FREEDOM OF INFORMATION: THE IMPLICATIONS FOR THE OMBUDSMAN
DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9299.1995.tb00827.x
UCL classification: UCL > School of Arts and Social Sciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/113553
Downloads since deposit
0Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item