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Injection drug users' perceptions of drug treatment services and attitudes toward substitution therapy: A qualitative study in three Russian cities

Bobrova, N; Alcorn, R; Rhodes, T; Rughnikov, I; Neifeld, E; Power, R; (2007) Injection drug users' perceptions of drug treatment services and attitudes toward substitution therapy: A qualitative study in three Russian cities. J SUBST ABUSE TREAT , 33 (4) 373 - 378. 10.1016/j.jsat.2007.02.002.

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Abstract

This study explored injection drug users' (IDUs) perceptions of drug abuse treatment and treatment providers in three Russian cities as well as their attitudes toward opiate substitution therapy, which is currently not available in Russia. Data were collected from 121 qualitative interviews with IDUs conducted in 2003-2004. Negative perceptions of available treatments were related to poor treatment outcomes, judgmental service providers, lack of psychologic services, and short lengths of stay in treatment. Positive perceptions were associated with receiving psychosocial care and nonjudgmental attitudes from providers. Most participants had heard about opiate substitution therapy, and some had treated themselves using methadone from the black market. Although respondents had doubts that opiate substitution therapy could work effectively in Russia, most agreed that this type of treatment would help IDUs function better in the society. (c) 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Type:Article
Title:Injection drug users' perceptions of drug treatment services and attitudes toward substitution therapy: A qualitative study in three Russian cities
DOI:10.1016/j.jsat.2007.02.002
Keywords:drug treatment, perceptions, Russia, substitution therapy, OUTCOMES, PROBATIONERS, RECIDIVISM, RECOVERY, HIV
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care

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