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Does Choose & Book fail to deliver the expected choice to patients? A survey of patients' experience of outpatient appointment booking

Green, J.; McDowall, Z.; Potts, H.W.W.; (2008) Does Choose & Book fail to deliver the expected choice to patients? A survey of patients' experience of outpatient appointment booking. BMC Medical Informatics and Decision Making , 8 (1) p. 36. 10.1186/1472-6947-8-36. Green open access

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Abstract

Provisional abstract: Background: Choose and Book is a central part of the UK Government patient choice agenda that seeks to provide patients with a choice over the time, date and place of their first outpatient appointment. This is done through the use of a computerised booking system. After a 2004 pilot study, Choose and Book was formally launched in January 2006. This is the first study of patient experience of Choose and Book since then. Methods: A questionnaire survey of reported experience of choice over the time, data and place of appointment, carried out in a National Health Service hospital in London. 104 patients at their first outpatient appointment completed the questionnaire, consisting of a consecutive series of patients referred through Choose and Book and a sample referred through the conventional booking system. Results: Among the Choose and Book patients, 66% (31/47; 95% CI 52 to 78%) reported not being given a choice of appointment date, 66% (31/47; 95% CI 52 to 78%) reported not being given a choice of appointment time, 86% (37/43; 95% CI 74 to 94%) reported being given a choice of fewer than four hospitals in total and 32% (15/47; 95% CI 20 to 46%) reported not being given any choice of hospital. Conclusions: In this study, patients did not experience the degree of choice that Choose and Book was designed to deliver.

Type: Article
Title: Does Choose & Book fail to deliver the expected choice to patients? A survey of patients' experience of outpatient appointment booking
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/1472-6947-8-36
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1472-6947-8-36
Language: English
Additional information: This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
UCL classification: UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > CHIME
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/11081
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