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Police Empathy and Victim PTSD as Potential Factors in Rape Case Attrition

Maddox, L; Lee, D; Barker, C; (2011) Police Empathy and Victim PTSD as Potential Factors in Rape Case Attrition. Journal of Police and Criminal Psychology , 26 (2) pp. 112-117. 10.1007/s11896-010-9075-6.

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Abstract

This exploratory study investigated whether rape victims' subjective perceptions of whether to proceed with legal action were associated with their experience of disclosing to the police during their initial interview. Specifically, the study investigated associations between symptoms of PTSD, shame and self-blame post-rape, subjective perceptions of police empathy and subjective perception of victims' intentions to take the case to court. Participants (N = 22) were found to have elevated levels of PTSD severity, shame and self-blame. Police empathy was positively correlated with victims' ratings of likelihood of taking the case to court, and negatively correlated with PTSD severity and shame. These preliminary findings suggest that training police officers how to respond more empathically to psychologically distressed rape victims may potentially help reduce victim attrition rates. © 2010 Springer Science + Business Media, LLC.

Type: Article
Title: Police Empathy and Victim PTSD as Potential Factors in Rape Case Attrition
DOI: 10.1007/s11896-010-9075-6
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/1055388
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