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Does the method of detection of breast cancer affect subsequent psychiatric morbidity?

Burgess, C.C.; Ramirez, A.J.; Richards, M.A.; Potts, H.W.W.; (2002) Does the method of detection of breast cancer affect subsequent psychiatric morbidity? European Journal of Cancer , 38 (12) pp. 1622-1625. 10.1016/S0959-8049(02)00132-6.

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Abstract

The aim of this prospective study was to compare the prevalence of psychiatric morbidity following diagnosis of breast cancer between a group of women presenting with screen-detected cancer and a group presenting with symptomatic disease. Psychiatric symptoms were elicited using the Structured Clinical Interview (SCID) and classified according to DSM-III criteria. 61 (46%) of 132 women interviewed experienced an episode of psychiatric disorder between 1 month before diagnosis and 12 months post-diagnosis. There was no association between detection by screening of breast cancer and psychiatric disorder (Odds Ratio (OR) 0.8, 95% Confidence Interval (CI) 0.4–1.8 P=0.7). The occurrence of an episode of psychiatric disorder was associated with a previous history of treatment for psychological problems (OR 2.4, 95% CI 1.1–5.5, P=0.02). The results suggest there is no increased risk of developing psychiatric morbidity associated with the detection of cancer through the National Breast Screening Programme.

Type:Article
Title:Does the method of detection of breast cancer affect subsequent psychiatric morbidity?
DOI:10.1016/S0959-8049(02)00132-6
Publisher version:http://dx.doi.org/doi:10.1016/S0959-8049(02)00132-6
Language:English
Keywords:symptomatic, screen-detected, breast cancer, psychiatric morbidity
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > CHIME

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