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The national safety camera programme: three-year evaluation report

Gains, A; Heydecker, B; Shrewsbury, J; Robertson, S; (2004) The national safety camera programme: three-year evaluation report. UCL (University College London), Department for Transport: London, UK.

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Abstract

In 2000, a system was introduced that allowed eight pilot areas to recoverthe costs of operating speed and red-light cameras (safety cameras) fromfines resulting from enforcement. In 2001, legislation was introduced thatallowed the system to be extended to other areas. A national programmewas then gradually introduced.In February 2003, the Department for Transport (DfT) published a researchreport 1 that analysed the effectiveness of the system in the eight pilot areasover the first two years (April 2000 to March 2002). This report updates thisanalysis to the 24 areas that were operating within the programme over thefirst three years (April 2000 to March 2003). Only areas operating within theprogramme for at least a year were included in the analysis. High level resultsare as follows:Vehicle speeds were down ? surveys showed that vehicle speeds atspeed camera sites had dropped by around 7% following the introductionof cameras. At new sites, there was a 32% reduction in vehicles breakingthe speed limit. At fixed sites, there was a 71% reduction and at mobilesites there was a 21% reduction. Overall, the proportion of vehicles speedingexcessively (ie 15mph more than the speed limit) fell by 80% at fixed camerasites, and 28% at mobile camera sites. Both casualties and deaths were down ? after allowing for the long-termtrend there was a 33% reduction in personal injury collisions (PICs) at siteswhere cameras were introduced. Overall, this meant that 40% fewer peoplewere killed or seriously injured. At camera sites, there was also a reductionof over 100 fatalities per annum (40% fewer). There were 870 fewer peoplekilled or seriously injured and 4,030 fewer personal injury collisions perannum. There was a clear correlation between reductions in speed andreductions in PICs.There was a positive cost-benefit of around 4:1. In the third year, thebenefits to society from the avoided injuries were in excess of £221millioncompared to enforcement costs of around £54million.The public supported the use of safety cameras for targetedenforcement. This was evidenced by public attitude surveys, both locallyand at a national level.Overall, this report concludes that safety cameras have reduced collisions,casualties and deaths.

Type: Report
Title: The national safety camera programme: three-year evaluation report
Additional information: Imported via OAI, 7:29:01 11th Nov 2005
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Civil, Environ and Geomatic Eng
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/103529
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