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Learning from History: Edith Korner's Vision Rediscovered

Murphy, J; (2004) Learning from History: Edith Korner's Vision Rediscovered. In: Rigby, M, (ed.) Vision and Value in Health Information. (11 - 30). Radcliffe Medical Press: Oxford.

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Abstract

It is now more than twenty years since the DHSS set up the NHS/DHSS Steering Group on Health Services Information, chaired by Edith Körner. This initiative was the first comprehensive and detailed review of the statistics available for health service management since the health service was founded in 1948. If we subscribe to the view that the solution to current information problems in the NHS lies with advances in communication and information technologies, then Edith Körner would seem to have little relevance to the challenges facing the health service today. The goal of this chapter, and indeed of this entire collection of essays, is to challenge this perception by demonstrating that Edith Körner's work still has relevance for the NHS and to all those involved with the modernisation agenda. The reason for Körner’s continuing relevance lies in the fact that she identified a set of methodological and epistemological problems which are as relevant today as they were twenty years ago. More to the point, some of her recommendations which were not implemented are worth revisiting.

Type:Book chapter
Title:Learning from History: Edith Korner's Vision Rediscovered
ISBN:1 85775 863 3
Additional information:This book contains a series of specially commissioned essays on the innovative use and development of information in health care. Foreword by Dame Deirdre Hine (Past President of the Royal Society of Medicine and Chaire, Commission for Health Improvement)
Keywords:Health Informatics, Information Management NHS, Information Quality, Korner Reports, Resistance to Change
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > CHIME

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