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Tapping into the potential of peer tutors

Murphy, J; (2003) Tapping into the potential of peer tutors. In: (Proceedings) Teach Globally. Learn Locally: Innovations in Health and Biomedical Informatics Education in the 21st Century, IMIA Working Group on Education. : Portland, Oregon, USA.

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Abstract

Computer literacy is no longer optional for our medical students. From day one of their studies they need to be able to communicate by email, look up information about their timetable on the intranet, and use an elibrary. In addition it is assumed they have the ability to use standard software packages to prepare assignments, projects, and group presentations. The challenge facing medical schools is to ensure that all students have the necessary IT skills to cope with the demands of their curricula. For the past five years we have been running a highly successful peer-tutoring project to provide support to students who arrive without the necessary IT skills. This paper will report on the methods (how we recruit and train the peer tutors; how we identify those who need help; how we deliver the training) and the outcomes. We now have six years of data on the IT skills of 1,5000 students. Our peer tutor group (n=108) has become a valuable resource to the medical school, providing teaching assistants to a range of course and personal trainers for our reverse mentoring scheme. Finally, we are working with staff and students in the International Health and Medical Education Centre to promote a peer-tutoring scheme in Tanzania.

Type:Proceedings paper
Title:Tapping into the potential of peer tutors
Event:Teach Globally. Learn Locally: Innovations in Health and Biomedical Informatics Education in the 21st Century, IMIA Working Group on Education
Additional information:Imported via OAI, 7:29:02 11th Feb 2006
UCL classification:UCL > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Population Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health Care > CHIME

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