UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The adjusted global antiphospholipid syndrome score (aGAPSS) and the risk of recurrent thrombosis: Results from the APS ACTION cohort

Radin, M; Sciascia, S; Erkan, D; Pengo, V; Tektonidou, MG; Ugarte, A; Meroni, P; ... APS ACTION, ; + view all (2019) The adjusted global antiphospholipid syndrome score (aGAPSS) and the risk of recurrent thrombosis: Results from the APS ACTION cohort. Seminars in Arthritis and Rheumatism 10.1016/j.semarthrit.2019.04.009. (In press).

[img] Text
Efthymiou Manuscript_Marked_V4.pdf - ["content_typename_Accepted version" not defined]
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 3 May 2020.

Download (782kB)

Abstract

OBJECTIVES: To assess whether patients with antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) and history of recurrent thrombosis have higher levels of adjusted Global AntiphosPholipid Syndrome Score (aGAPSS) when compared to patients without recurrent thrombosis. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study of antiphospholipid antibody (aPL)-positive patients, we identified APS patients with a history of documented thrombosis from the AntiPhospholipid Syndrome Alliance For Clinical Trials and InternatiOnal Networking (APS ACTION) Clinical Database and Repository ("Registry"). Data on aPL-related medical history and cardiovascular risk factors were retrospectively collected. The aGAPSS was calculated at Registry entry by adding the points corresponding to the risk factors: three for hyperlipidemia, one for arterial hypertension, five for positive anticardiolipin antibodies, four for positive anti-β2 glycoprotein-I antibodies and four for positive lupus anticoagulant test. RESULTS: The analysis included 379 APS patients who presented with arterial and/or venous thrombosis. Overall, significantly higher aGAPSS were seen in patients with recurrent thrombosis (arterial or venous) compared to those without recurrence (7.8 ± 3.3 vs. 6 ± 3.9, p<0.05). When analyzed based on the site of the recurrence, patients with recurrent arterial, but not venous, thrombosis had higher aGAPSS (8.1 ± SD 2.9 vs. 6 ± 3.9; p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: Based on analysis of our international large-scale Registry of aPL-positive patients, the aGAPSS might help risk stratifying patients based on the likelihood of developing recurrent thrombosis in APS.

Type: Article
Title: The adjusted global antiphospholipid syndrome score (aGAPSS) and the risk of recurrent thrombosis: Results from the APS ACTION cohort
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1016/j.semarthrit.2019.04.009
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semarthrit.2019.04.009
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Antiphospholipid antibodies, Antiphospholipid syndrome, Cardiovascular, GAPSS, Risk stratification, Thrombosis
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Haematology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10078245
Downloads since deposit
1Download
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item