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Reduction in the occurrence of distressing involuntary memories following propranolol or hydrocortisone in healthy women

Kamboj, SK; Gong, AT; Sim, Z; Rashid, AA; Baba, A; Iskandar, G; Das, RK; (2019) Reduction in the occurrence of distressing involuntary memories following propranolol or hydrocortisone in healthy women. Psychological Medicine 10.1017/S0033291719001028. (In press).

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Pharmacological treatments targeting the neuroendocrine stress response may hold special promise in secondary prevention of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). However,This version is the author accepted manuscript/version of record [delete as appropriate]. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions. findings from clinical trials have been inconsistent and the efficacy of specific drugs, their temporal window of efficacy, effective doses and the characteristics of likely treatment responders remain unclear. METHOD: Using an experimental human model of distressing involuntary memory formation, we compare the effects of two drugs that have theoretical or empirical support as secondary preventive agents in PTSD. Eighty-eight healthy women (average age: 23.5 years) received oral propranolol (80 mg), hydrocortisone (30 mg), or matched placebo immediately after viewing a 'trauma film'. They then completed daily, time-stamped intrusion diaries for 1 week, at the end of which, voluntary memory was tested. RESULTS: While neither drug affected voluntary memory for the trauma narrative, propranolol treatment was associated with 42% fewer, and hydrocortisone with 55% fewer intrusions across the week, relative to placebo. Additionally, propranolol reduced general trauma-like symptoms, and post-drug cortisol levels were negatively correlated with intrusion frequency in the hydrocortisone group. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, this study shows substantial reductions in intrusive memories and preserved voluntary narrative-declarative memory following either propranolol or hydrocortisone in an experimental model of psychological trauma. As such, despite some inconsistencies in clinical trials, our findings support continued investigation of propranolol and hydrocortisone as secondary preventive agents for re-experiencing symptoms of PTSD. The findings also suggest that it is critical for future research to identify the conditions governing the preventive efficacy of these drugs in PTSD.

Type: Article
Title: Reduction in the occurrence of distressing involuntary memories following propranolol or hydrocortisone in healthy women
Location: England
DOI: 10.1017/S0033291719001028
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1017/S0033291719001028
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Acute stress disorder, glucocorticoid, hydrocortisone, intrusions, involuntary memory, noradrenergic, posttraumatic stress disorder, propranolol, secondary prevention
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10074634
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