UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Implementation of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROMs) from Specialist Pain Clinics in England and Wales: experience from a nationwide study

Price, CM; Williams, AC; Smith, BH; Bottle, A; (2019) Implementation of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROMs) from Specialist Pain Clinics in England and Wales: experience from a nationwide study. European Journal of Pain 10.1002/ejp.1406. (In press).

[img] Text
Price_et_al-2019-European_Journal_of_Pain.pdf - ["content_typename_Accepted version" not defined]
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 25 November 2019.

Download (863kB)

Abstract

INTRODUCTION: Evaluating outcomes in routine clinical practice is a significant challenge for specialist pain clinics due to the complexity of interventions provided and the subjective nature of pain. This study reports findings from implementation of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROMs) in pain clinics in England and Wales between 2011-2013. METHODS: A paper-based questionnaire was administered at a first appointment in participating centres. This assessed quality of life, experience of health care and health care usage with postal follow-up at 6 and 12 months by the research team. Feasibility was assessed in terms of response rates, completion rates and outcomes. RESULTS: Ninety-one (56%) clinics participated, entering 9588 patients (19% of those eligible). For responders there was a 92% item completion rate. The drop-out rate was high, 46% and 19% returned questions at 6 and 12 months respectively. Quality of life at baseline was low, with a mean EQ5D-3L Time Trade Off (TTO) value of 0.32. Amongst responders at 12 months, 92% continued to experience significant pain. For those with planned discharges 30% achieved the Minimal Important Change (MIC) for quality of life. Nonetheless, 70% reported positive experiences of care. CONCLUSIONS: Patients attending UK pain clinics report an extraordinarily poor quality of life and difficulty with understanding their condition. Problems with PROMs implementation included initial recruitment, follow-up response rates, classification systems and benchmarking. Successful implementation should include use of electronic data capture, feedback and focus on gradual improvement. To achieve this would require extended periods of funding. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: Implementation of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROMs) from Specialist Pain Clinics in England and Wales: experience from a nationwide study
Location: England
DOI: 10.1002/ejp.1406
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1002/ejp.1406
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10074232
Downloads since deposit
1Download
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item