UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Physical frailty in older men: prospective associations with diet quality and patterns

Parsons, TJ; Papachristou, E; Atkins, JL; Papacosta, O; Ash, S; Lennon, LT; Whincup, PH; ... Wannamethee, SG; + view all (2019) Physical frailty in older men: prospective associations with diet quality and patterns. Age and Ageing , 48 (3) pp. 355-360. 10.1093/ageing/afy216.

[img] Text
Ramsay_Physical frailty in older men. Prospective associations with diet quality and patterns_AAM.pdf - ["content_typename_Accepted version" not defined]
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 23 January 2020.

Download (347kB)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: increasing numbers of older adults are living with frailty and its adverse consequences. We investigated relationships between diet quality or patterns and incident physical frailty in older British men and whether any associations were influenced by inflammation. METHODS: prospective study of 945 men from the British Regional Heart Study aged 70–92 years with no prevalent frailty. Incident frailty was assessed by questionnaire after 3 years of follow-up. Frailty was defined as having at least three of: low grip strength, low physical activity, slow walking speed, unintentional weight loss and feeling of low energy, all based on self-report. The Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI) based on WHO dietary guidelines and the Elderly Dietary Index (EDI) based on a Mediterranean-style dietary intake were computed from questionnaire data and three dietary patterns were identified using principal components analysis: prudent, high fat/low fibre and high sugar. RESULTS: men in the highest EDI category and those who followed a prudent diet were less likely to become frail [top vs bottom category odds ratio (OR) (95% CI) 0.49 (0.30, 0.82) and 0.53 (0.30, 0.92) respectively] after adjustment for potential confounders including BMI and prevalent cardiovascular disease. No significant association was seen for the HDI. By contrast those who had a high fat low fibre diet pattern were more likely to become frail [OR (95% CI) 2.54 (1.46, 4.40)]. These associations were not mediated by C-reactive protein (marker of inflammation). CONCLUSIONS: the findings suggest adherence to a Mediterranean–style diet is associated with reduced risk of developing frailty in older people.

Type: Article
Title: Physical frailty in older men: prospective associations with diet quality and patterns
Location: England
DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afy216
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1093/ageing/afy216
Language: English
Additional information: his version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Frailty, diet, older people
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Psychology and Human Development
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > Institute of Epidemiology and Health > Primary Care and Population Health
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10073891
Downloads since deposit
2Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item