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Early life predictors of adolescent suicidal thoughts and adverse outcomes in two population-based cohort studies

Dykxhoorn, J; Hatcher, S; Roy-Gagnon, M-H; Colman, I; (2017) Early life predictors of adolescent suicidal thoughts and adverse outcomes in two population-based cohort studies. PLoS One , 12 (8) , Article e0183182. 10.1371/journal.pone.0183182. Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Understanding suicidality has proven challenging given the complex aetiology in early childhood. Being able to accurately predict groups at increased risk of developing suicidal thoughts may aid in the development of targeted prevention programs that mitigate increased vulnerability. Further, the predictors of suicidal thoughts may be shared with other outcomes in adolescence. Previous research has linked many factors to suicidality, so the objective of this study was to consider how these factors may act together to increase risk of suicidal thoughts and other non-mental health outcomes. METHODS: Two longitudinal datasets were used in this analysis: the National Longitudinal Survey of Children and Youth (NLSCY) and the Avon Longitudinal Survey of Parents and Children (ALSPAC). A Classification and Regression Tree model comprised of 75 factors describing early childhood was constructed to identify subgroups of adolescents at high risk of suicidal thoughts in the NLSCY and was validated in ALSPAC. These subgroups were investigated to see if they also had elevated rates of antisocial behaviour, substance misuse, poor physical health, poor mental health, risky health behaviours, and/or poor academic performance. RESULTS: The sensitivity was calculated to be 22·7%, specificity was 89·2%, positive predictive value 17·8%, and negative predictive value 91·8% and had similar accuracy in the validation dataset. The models were better at predicting other adverse outcomes compared to suicidal thoughts. CONCLUSION: There are groups of risk factors present in early life that can predict higher risk of suicidality in adolescence. Notably, these factors were also predictive of a range of adverse outcomes in adolescence.

Type: Article
Title: Early life predictors of adolescent suicidal thoughts and adverse outcomes in two population-based cohort studies
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0183182
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0183182
Language: English
Additional information: © 2017 Dykxhoorn et al. This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited. http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Adolescent, Child, Child, Preschool, Female, Humans, Longitudinal Studies, Male, Mental Health, Risk Factors, Suicidal Ideation, Suicide
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10073014
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