UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

The application of Psychologically Informed Practice: Observations of experienced physiotherapists working with people with chronic pain

Denneny, D; Frijdal, A; Berthouze, N; Greenwod, J; McLoughlin, R; Petersen, K; Singh, A; (2019) The application of Psychologically Informed Practice: Observations of experienced physiotherapists working with people with chronic pain. Physiotherapy 10.1016/j.physio.2019.01.014. (In press).

[img] Text
Berthouze_PHYST-18-197-1.pdf - ["content_typename_Accepted version" not defined]
Access restricted to UCL open access staff until 5 February 2020.

Download (1MB)

Abstract

Objectives: Psychologically informed practice (PIP) is advocated for physiotherapists to help people with chronic pain. There is little research observing how PIP is delivered in clinical practice. This study describes behaviours and techniques used by experienced physiotherapists working with groups of people with chronic pain. Setting and Participants: Experienced physiotherapists (n = 4) were observed working with groups of people with chronic pain in out-patient pain management, and physiotherapy departments, in a large UK city centre teaching hospital. Design We observed the clinical behaviours and interpersonal skills of experienced psychologically informed physiotherapists, enriched by their accounts of intentions. The physiotherapists were audio and video recorded delivering group movement sessions. Recordings were reviewed with the physiotherapists for elaboration of intentions, then thematically analysed for comparison with defined CBT competencies. Results: Four themes representing physiotherapist intentions when working with people with chronic pain were identified; building a therapeutic alliance, reducing perceived threat, reconceptualising beliefs and somatic experience, and fostering self-efficacy. The physiotherapists also reflected on challenges including engaging patients in self-management, encouraging activity and reinforcing rather than correcting movement. Considerable overlap existed between the observed behaviours in this study and existing CBT competencies. Conclusions: This paper complements current recommendations for delivering psychologically informed physiotherapy by providing examples of these skills being used in clinical practice. Further research supporting the development of training for, and mentoring of, physiotherapists, to promote competence and confidence in delivering psychologically informed interventions is recommended.

Type: Article
Title: The application of Psychologically Informed Practice: Observations of experienced physiotherapists working with people with chronic pain
DOI: 10.1016/j.physio.2019.01.014
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.physio.2019.01.014
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Chronic pain; Psychologically informed; Cognitive Behavioural Therapy; Qualitative
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > UCL Interaction Centre
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067783
Downloads since deposit
1Download
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item