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Smokers' use of electronic cigarettes before, during, and in the month after hospitalization. Findings from the Helping HAND 2 Study

Herbec, A; Chang, Y; Tindle, H; Rigotti, N; (2019) Smokers' use of electronic cigarettes before, during, and in the month after hospitalization. Findings from the Helping HAND 2 Study. Addictive Behaviors , 91 pp. 5-11. 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.10.039.

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Abstract

Introduction Hospitalization can motivate smokers to attempt cessation, and some smokers might use e-cigarettes to aid quitting after discharge. Little is known about the patterns and predictors of smokers' e-cigarette use immediately before, during, and after hospitalization. Methods Secondary data analysis of a multi-site randomized controlled trial that enrolled 1357 hospitalized smokers planning to quit offered two intensities of post-discharge cessation treatment and reached 1100 participants at 1-month follow-up. We assessed reasons for and patterns of e-cigarette use before, during and immediately after hospitalization. Multivariable logistic regression models identified independent predictors of e-cigarette use. Results E-cigarettes were used, primarily to aid quitting, by 21.4% of smokers in the month before admission, 3.1% during hospitalization, and 18.3% in the month after discharge. At 1 month, 10.6% were past 7-day (current) e-cigarette users, but few used e-cigarettes regularly and 57.3% also smoked tobacco. New e-cigarette use in the month after discharge was rare. The adjusted odds ratio (AOR;95%CI) for current e-cigarette use was higher among smokers who used e-cigarettes before hospitalization (5.08;3.31–7.81), consumed more alcohol (1.80;1.16–2.80) and had less confidence to quit (1.66;1.05–2.61). The AOR was lower among non-Hispanic blacks (0.25;0.09–0.71), Medicaid-insured (0.56;0.33–0.93), and those randomly assigned to receive free cessation medication and counseling at discharge (0.58;0.38–0.90). Conclusions Following hospitalization, some smokers who plan to quit use e-cigarettes, particularly if they used them before admission, are less confident to quit, or have less easy access to conventional treatment. Clinicians should document and be prepared to address e-cigarette use among hospitalized smokers.

Type: Article
Title: Smokers' use of electronic cigarettes before, during, and in the month after hospitalization. Findings from the Helping HAND 2 Study
DOI: 10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.10.039
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2018.10.039
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Electronic cigarettes, Hospitalization, Patients, Discharge, Predictors of use, Smoking
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067444
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