UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Schizophrenia on YouTube

Nour, MM; Nour, MH; Tsatalou, O-M; Barrera, A; (2017) Schizophrenia on YouTube. Psychiatric Services , 68 (1) pp. 70-74. 10.1176/appi.ps.201500541. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
Nour_FINAL_PLAINTEXT.pdf - ["content_typename_Accepted version" not defined]

Download (408kB) | Preview

Abstract

Objective: YouTube (www.youtube.com) is the most popular video-sharing Web site on the Internet and is used by medical students as a source of information regarding mental health conditions, including schizophrenia. The accuracy and educational utility of schizophrenia presentations on YouTube are unknown. The purpose of this study was to analyze the accuracy of depictions of psychosis in the context of a diagnosis of schizophrenia (referred to in this article as “acute schizophrenia”) on YouTube and to assess the utility of these videos as educational tools for teaching medical students to recognize the clinical features of acute schizophrenia. / Methods: YouTube was searched for videos purporting to show acute schizophrenia. Eligible videos were independently rated by two consultant psychiatrists on two separate occasions 22 days apart for diagnostic accuracy, psychopathology, and educational utility. / Results: Videos (N=4,200) were assessed against predefined inclusion and exclusion criteria. The majority were not eligible for further analysis, mostly because they did not claim to show a patient with schizophrenia (74%) or contained duplicated content (11%). Of 35 videos that met the eligibility and adequacy criteria, only 12 accurately depicted acute schizophrenia. Accurate videos were characterized by persecutory delusions (83%), inappropriate affect (75%), and negative symptoms (83%). Despite the fact that 83% of accurate videos were deemed to have good educational utility compared with 15% of inaccurate videos, accurate and inaccurate videos had similar view counts (290,048 versus 186,124). / Conclusions: Schizophrenia presentations on YouTube offer a distorted picture of the condition.

Type: Article
Title: Schizophrenia on YouTube
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1176/appi.ps.201500541
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ps.201500541
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10067145
Downloads since deposit
23Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item