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Volitional modulation of higher-order visual cortex alters human perception

Ekanayake, J; Ridgway, GR; Winston, JS; Feredoes, E; Razi, A; Koush, Y; Scharnowski, F; ... Rees, G; + view all (2019) Volitional modulation of higher-order visual cortex alters human perception. NeuroImage , 188 pp. 291-301. 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.11.054.

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Abstract

Can we change our perception by controlling our brain activation? Awareness during binocular rivalry is shaped by the alternating perception of different stimuli presented separately to each monocular view. We tested the possibility of causally influencing the likelihood of a stimulus entering awareness. To do this, participants were trained with neurofeedback, using realtime functional magnetic resonance imaging (rt-fMRI), to differentially modulate activation in stimulus-selective visual cortex representing each of the monocular images. Neurofeedback training led to altered bistable perception associated with activity changes in the trained regions. The degree to which training influenced perception predicted changes in grey and white matter volumes of these regions. Short-term intensive neurofeedback training therefore sculpted the dynamics of visual awareness, with associated plasticity in the human brain.

Type: Article
Title: Volitional modulation of higher-order visual cortex alters human perception
Location: United States
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.11.054
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2018.11.054
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10066826
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