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The Effect of ICU Out-of-Hours Admission on Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

Galloway, M; Hegarty, A; McGill, S; Arulkumaran, N; Brett, SJ; Harrison, D; (2018) The Effect of ICU Out-of-Hours Admission on Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. [Review]. Critical Care Medicine , 46 (2) pp. 290-299. 10.1097/CCM.0000000000002837.

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Abstract

Objective: Organizational factors are associated with outcome of critically ill patients and may vary by time of day and day of week. We aimed to identify the association between out-of-hours admission to critical care and mortality. Data Sources: MEDLINE (via Ovid), and EMBASE (via Ovid) Study Selection: We performed a systematic search of the literature for studies on out-of-hours adult general intensive care unit (ICU) admission on patient mortality. Data Extraction: Meta-analyses were performed and Forest plots drawn using RevMan software. Data are presented as odd ratios (OR (95% confidence intervals), p-values). Data synthesis: A total of 16 studies with 902551 patients were included in the analysis with a crude mortality of 18.2%. Fourteen studies with 717,331 patients reported mortality rates by time of admission and 11 studies with 835,032 patients by day of admission. Admission to ICU at night was not associated with an increased odds of mortality compared to admissions during the day (OR 1.04(0.98-1.11); p=0.18). However, admissions during the weekend were associated with an increased odds of death compared to ICU admissions during weekdays (1.05(1.01-1.09), p=0.006). Increased mortality associated with weekend ICU admissions compared to weekday ICU admissions were limited to North American countries (1.08(1.03- 1.12); p=0.0004). The absence of a routine overnight on site intensivist was associated with increased mortality among weekend ICU admissions compared to weekday ICU admissions (1.11(1.00-1.22); p=0.04) and nighttime admissions compared to daytime ICU admissions (1.11(1.00-1.23); p=0.05). Conclusion: Adjusted risk of death for ICU admission was greater over the weekends compared to weekdays. The absence of a dedicated intensivist on site overnight may be associated with increased mortality for acute admissions. These results need to be interpreted in context of the organization of local healthcare resources before changes to healthcare policy are implemented.

Type: Article
Title: The Effect of ICU Out-of-Hours Admission on Mortality: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis
DOI: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000002837
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1097/CCM.0000000000002837
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10065674
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