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Trends in Educational Mobility: How Does China Compare to Europe and the United States?

Gruijters, R; Chan, T; Ermisch, J; (2019) Trends in Educational Mobility: How Does China Compare to Europe and the United States? Chinese Journal of Sociology (In press).

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Abstract

Despite impressive rise in school enrollment rates over the past few decades, there are concerns about growing inequality of educational opportunity in China. In this paper, we examine the level and trend of educational mobility in China, and compare them to those of Germany, the Netherlands, the UK and the US. Educational mobility is defined as the association between parents’ and children’s educational attainment. We show that China’s economic boom has been accompanied by a large decline in relative educational mobility chances, as measured by odds ratios. To elaborate, relative rates of educational mobility in China were, by international standards, quite high for those who grew up under state socialism. For the most recent cohorts, however, educational mobility rates have dropped to a level that is comparable to those of European countries, though it is still higher than the US level.

Type: Article
Title: Trends in Educational Mobility: How Does China Compare to Europe and the United States?
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Education > UCL Institute of Education > IOE - Social Science
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10063025
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