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Engineered Models of Metastasis with Application to Study Cancer Biomechanics

Chen, MB; Kamm, RD; Moeendarbary, E; (2018) Engineered Models of Metastasis with Application to Study Cancer Biomechanics. In: Dong, C and Zahir, N and Konstantopoulos, K, (eds.) Biomechanics in Oncology. (pp. 189-207). Springer Nature: Cham, Switzerland.

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Abstract

Three-dimensional complex biomechanical interactions occur from the initial steps of tumor formation to the later phases of cancer metastasis. Conventional monolayer cultures cannot recapitulate the complex microenvironment and chemical and mechanical cues that tumor cells experience during their metastatic journey, nor the complexity of their interactions with other, noncancerous cells. As alternative approaches, various engineered models have been developed to recapitulate specific features of each step of metastasis with tunable microenvironments to test a variety of mechanistic hypotheses. Here the main recent advances in the technologies that provide deeper insight into the process of cancer dissemination are discussed, with an emphasis on three-dimensional and mechanical factors as well as interactions between multiple cell types.

Type: Book chapter
Title: Engineered Models of Metastasis with Application to Study Cancer Biomechanics
ISBN-13: 978-3-319-95293-2
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-319-95294-9_10
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-95294-9_10
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Cancer metastasis, Mechanobiology, Tumorigenesis, Intravasation, Extravasation, Cell migration, Vascularization, Cancer models, Microfluidics, Tumor spheroids
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Engineering Science > Dept of Mechanical Engineering
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10061421
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