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Instruction manual for the ILAE 2017 operational classification of seizure types

Fisher, RS; Cross, JH; D'Souza, C; French, JA; Haut, SR; Higurashi, N; Hirsch, E; ... Zuberi, SM; + view all (2017) Instruction manual for the ILAE 2017 operational classification of seizure types. Epilepsia , 58 (4) pp. 531-542. 10.1111/epi.13671. Green open access

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Abstract

This companion paper to the introduction of the International League Against Epilepsy (ILAE) 2017 classification of seizure types provides guidance on how to employ the classification. Illustration of the classification is enacted by tables, a glossary of relevant terms, mapping of old to new terms, suggested abbreviations, and examples. Basic and extended versions of the classification are available, depending on the desired degree of detail. Key signs and symptoms of seizures (semiology) are used as a basis for categories of seizures that are focal or generalized from onset or with unknown onset. Any focal seizure can further be optionally characterized by whether awareness is retained or impaired. Impaired awareness during any segment of the seizure renders it a focal impaired awareness seizure. Focal seizures are further optionally characterized by motor onset signs and symptoms: atonic, automatisms, clonic, epileptic spasms, or hyperkinetic, myoclonic, or tonic activity. Nonmotor‐onset seizures can manifest as autonomic, behavior arrest, cognitive, emotional, or sensory dysfunction. The earliest prominent manifestation defines the seizure type, which might then progress to other signs and symptoms. Focal seizures can become bilateral tonic–clonic. Generalized seizures engage bilateral networks from onset. Generalized motor seizure characteristics comprise atonic, clonic, epileptic spasms, myoclonic, myoclonic–atonic, myoclonic–tonic–clonic, tonic, or tonic–clonic. Nonmotor (absence) seizures are typical or atypical, or seizures that present prominent myoclonic activity or eyelid myoclonia. Seizures of unknown onset may have features that can still be classified as motor, nonmotor, tonic–clonic, epileptic spasms, or behavior arrest. This “users’ manual” for the ILAE 2017 seizure classification will assist the adoption of the new system.

Type: Article
Title: Instruction manual for the ILAE 2017 operational classification of seizure types
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/epi.13671
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1111/epi.13671
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Classification, Seizures, Focal, Generalized, Epilepsy (taxonomy)
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Developmental Neurosciences Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10061387
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