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Multi-organ quantitative MRI for the assessment of liver disease - A whole much more than the sum of its parts

Chouhan, MD; Taylor, SA; Mookerjee, RP; (2018) Multi-organ quantitative MRI for the assessment of liver disease - A whole much more than the sum of its parts. Journal of Hepatology , 69 (5) pp. 996-998. 10.1016/j.jhep.2018.05.037. Green open access

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Abstract

Background & Aims Advancing liver disease results in deleterious changes in a number of critical organs. The ability to measure structure, blood flow and tissue perfusion within multiple organs in a single scan has implications for determining the balance of benefit vs. harm for therapies. Our aim was to establish the feasibility of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to assess changes in Compensated Cirrhosis (CC), and relate this to disease severity and future liver-related outcomes (LROs). Methods A total of 60 patients with CC, 40 healthy volunteers and 7 patients with decompensated cirrhosis were recruited. In a single scan session, MRI measures comprised phase-contrast MRI vessel blood flow, arterial spin labelling tissue perfusion, T1 longitudinal relaxation time, heart rate, cardiac index, and volume assessment of the liver, spleen and kidneys. We explored the association between MRI parameters and disease severity, analysing differences in baseline MRI parameters in the 11 (18%) patients with CC who experienced future LROs. Results In the liver, compositional changes were reflected by increased T1 in progressive disease (p <0.001) and an increase in liver volume in CC (p = 0.006), with associated progressive reduction in liver (p <0.001) and splenic (p <0.001) perfusion. A significant reduction in renal cortex T1 and increase in cardiac index and superior mesenteric arterial blood flow was seen with increasing disease severity. Baseline liver T1 (p = 0.01), liver perfusion (p <0.01), and renal cortex T1 (p <0.01) were significantly different in patients with CC who subsequently developed negative LROs. Conclusions MRI enables the contemporaneous assessment of organs in liver cirrhosis in a single scan without the requirement for a contrast agent. MRI parameters of liver T1, renal T1, hepatic and splenic perfusion, and superior mesenteric arterial blood flow were related to the risk of LROs. Lay summary This study assesses the changes to structure, blood flow and perfusion that occur in the key organs (liver, spleen and kidney) associated with severe liver disease (Compensated Cirrhosis), using magnetic resonance imaging. The magnetic resonance imaging measures which changed with disease severity and were related to negative liver-related clinical outcomes are described.

Type: Article
Title: Multi-organ quantitative MRI for the assessment of liver disease - A whole much more than the sum of its parts
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.jhep.2018.05.037
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhep.2018.05.037
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Gastroenterology & Hepatology, BLOOD-FLOW, CIRRHOSIS, FIBROSIS
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine > Metabolism and Experi Therapeutics
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10061142
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