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Frontal EEG asymmetry and later behavior vulnerability in infants with congenital visual impairment

O'Reilly, MA; Bathelt, J; Sakkalou, E; Sakki, H; Salt, A; Dale, NJ; de Haan, M; (2017) Frontal EEG asymmetry and later behavior vulnerability in infants with congenital visual impairment. Clinical Neurophysiology , 128 (11) pp. 2191-2199. 10.1016/j.clinph.2017.08.016. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Young children with congenital visual impairment (VI) are at increased risk of behavioral vulnerabilities. Studies on ‘at risk’ populations suggest that frontal EEG asymmetry may be associated with behavioral risk. We investigated frontal asymmetry at 1 year (Time 1), behavior at 2 years (Time 2) and their longitudinal associations within a sample of infants with VI. Frontal asymmetry in the VI sample at 1 year was also compared cross-sectionally to an age-matched typically sighted (TS) group. METHODS: At Time 1, 22 infants with VI and 10 TS infants underwent 128-channel EEG recording. Frontal asymmetry ratios were calculated from power spectral density values in the alpha frequency band. At Time 2, Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist data was obtained for the VI sample. RESULTS: 63.6% of the VI sample and 50% of the TS sample showed left frontal asymmetry; no significant difference in frontal asymmetry was found between the two groups. 22.7% of the VI sample had subclinical to clinical range ‘internalizing’ behavior difficulties. Greater left frontal asymmetry at one year was significantly associated with greater emotionally reactive scores at two years within the VI sample (r = 0.50, p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Left frontal asymmetry correlates with later behavior risk within this vulnerable population. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings make an important first contribution regarding the utility of frontal EEG asymmetry as a method to investigate risk in infants with VI.

Type: Article
Title: Frontal EEG asymmetry and later behavior vulnerability in infants with congenital visual impairment
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.clinph.2017.08.016
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.clinph.2017.08.016
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Clinical Neurology, Neurosciences, Neurosciences & Neurology, Frontal EEG asymmetry, Visual impairment, Vision, Vision disorders, Behavior, Infancy, Children, OPTIC-NERVE HYPOPLASIA, BRAIN ACTIVITY, ACTIVATION ASYMMETRY, APPROACH-WITHDRAWAL, APPROACH-MOTIVATION, PRESCHOOL-CHILDREN, DEPRESSED MOTHERS, ALPHA ASYMMETRY, SOCIAL-BEHAVIOR, EARLY-CHILDHOOD
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Developmental Neurosciences Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10059005
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