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On the importance of modeling fMRI transients when estimating effective connectivity: A dynamic causal modeling study using ASL data

Havlicek, M; Roebroeck, A; Friston, KJ; Gardumi, A; Ivanov, D; Uludag, K; (2017) On the importance of modeling fMRI transients when estimating effective connectivity: A dynamic causal modeling study using ASL data. NeuroImage , 155 pp. 217-233. 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.03.017. Green open access

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Abstract

Effective connectivity is commonly assessed using blood oxygenation level-dependent (BOLD) signals. In (Havlicek et al., 2015), we presented a novel, physiologically informed dynamic causal model (P-DCM) that extends current generative models. We demonstrated the improvements afforded by P-DCM in terms of the ability to model commonly observed neuronal and vascular transients in single regions. Here, we assess the ability of the novel and previous DCM variants to estimate effective connectivity among a network of five ROIs driven by a visuo-motor task. We demonstrate that connectivity estimates depend sensitively on the DCM used, due to differences in the modeling of hemodynamic response transients; such as the post-stimulus undershoot or adaptation during stimulation. In addition, using a novel DCM for arterial spin labeling (ASL) fMRI that measures BOLD and CBF signals simultaneously, we confirmed our findings (by using the BOLD data alone and in conjunction with CBF). We show that P-DCM provides better estimates of effective connectivity, regardless of whether it is applied to BOLD data alone or to ASL time-series, and that all new aspects of P-DCM (i.e. neuronal, neurovascular, hemodynamic components) constitute an improvement compared to those in the previous DCM variants. In summary, (i) accurate modeling of fMRI response transients is crucial to obtain valid effective connectivity estimates and (ii) any additional hemodynamic data, such as provided by ASL, increases the ability to disambiguate neuronal and vascular effects present in the BOLD signal.

Type: Article
Title: On the importance of modeling fMRI transients when estimating effective connectivity: A dynamic causal modeling study using ASL data
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.03.017
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.neuroimage.2017.03.017
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Neurosciences, Neuroimaging, Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging, Neurosciences & Neurology, DCM, Effective connectivity, ASL, BOLD signal, Hemodynamic transients, BOLD POSTSTIMULUS UNDERSHOOT, LABELING FUNCTIONAL MRI, NEGATIVE BOLD, BLOOD-FLOW, NEURONAL-ACTIVITY, SIGNAL CHANGES, FREE-ENERGY, BRAIN, RESPONSES, SENSITIVITY
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Imaging Neuroscience
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10057798
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