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Bio-electrical impedance vector analysis: testing Piccoli's model against objective body composition data in children and adolescents

Wells, JCK; Williams, JE; Quek, RY; Fewtrell, MS; (2018) Bio-electrical impedance vector analysis: testing Piccoli's model against objective body composition data in children and adolescents. European Journal of Clinical Nutrition 10.1038/s41430-018-0292-x. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: Bio-electrical impedance (BI) analysis is a simple body composition method ideal for children. However, its utility in sick or malnourished children is complicated by variability in hydration. BI vector analysis (BIVA) potentially resolves this, using a theoretical model that differentiates hydration from cell mass. We tested this model against reference methods in healthy children varying widely in age and nutritional status. SUBJECTS/METHODS: We compiled body composition data from 291 children and adolescents (50% male) aged 4-20 years of European ancestry. Measurements included anthropometry, BIVA outcomes (height-adjusted resistance (R/H) and reactance (Xc/H); phase angle (PA)), and fat-free mass (FFM), fat mass (FM) and FFM-hydration (HFFM) by the criterion 4-component model. All outcomes were converted to age- and sex-standardised standard deviation scores (SDS). Graphic analysis and regression analysis were used to evaluate the BIVA model. RESULTS: R/H and Xc/H declined with age in curvilinear manner, whereas PA increased linearly with age. R/H-SDS and Xc-SDS were negatively correlated with FFM-SDS, HFFM-SDS. and FM-SDS. PA was positively correlated with FFM-SDS but unrelated to HFFM-SDS and FM-SDS. CONCLUSIONS: While previous studies of adults with major fluid perturbations support the BIVA model, it is less successful in predicting variability in FFM in healthy children and adolescents. BIVA outcomes varied as predicted by the model with HFFM, but not as predicted with FFM. Variability in adiposity also explains some of the variability in BIVA traits. Further work is needed to develop a theoretical BIVA model for application in paediatric patients without major fluid disturbances.

Type: Article
Title: Bio-electrical impedance vector analysis: testing Piccoli's model against objective body composition data in children and adolescents
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1038/s41430-018-0292-x
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1038/s41430-018-0292-x
Language: English
Additional information: This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/.
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Pop Health Sciences > UCL GOS Institute of Child Health > ICH Pop, Policy and Practice Prog
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10055988
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