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The Influence of Fluid Intelligence, Executive Functions and Premorbid Intelligence on Memory in Frontal Patients

Chan, E; MacPherson, SE; Bozzali, M; Shallice, T; Cipolotti, L; (2018) The Influence of Fluid Intelligence, Executive Functions and Premorbid Intelligence on Memory in Frontal Patients. Frontiers in Psychology , 9 , Article 926. 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00926. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: It is commonly thought that memory deficits in frontal patients are a result of impairments in executive functions which impact upon storage and retrieval processes. Yet, few studies have specifically examined the relationship between memory performance and executive functions in frontal patients. Furthermore, the contribution of more general cognitive processes such as fluid intelligence and demographic factors such as age, education, and premorbid intelligence has not been considered. METHOD: Our study examined the relationship between recall and recognition memory and performance on measures of fluid intelligence, executive functions and premorbid intelligence in 39 frontal patients and 46 healthy controls. RESULTS: Recall memory impairments in frontal patients were strongly correlated with fluid intelligence, executive functions and premorbid intelligence. These factors were all found to be independent predictors of recall performance, with fluid intelligence being the strongest predictor. In contrast, recognition memory impairments were not related to any of these factors. Furthermore, age and education were not significantly correlated with either recall or recognition memory measures. CONCLUSION: Our findings show that recall memory in frontal patients was related to fluid intelligence, executive functions and premorbid intelligence. In contrast, recognition memory was not. These findings suggest that recall and recognition memory deficits following frontal injury arise from separable cognitive factors. Recognition memory tests may be more useful when assessing memory functions in frontal patients.

Type: Article
Title: The Influence of Fluid Intelligence, Executive Functions and Premorbid Intelligence on Memory in Frontal Patients
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00926
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2018.00926
Language: English
Additional information: © 2018 Chan, MacPherson, Bozzali, Shallice and Cipolotti. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) and the copyright owner are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: Social Sciences, Psychology, Multidisciplinary, Psychology, frontal lobes, recall, recognition, memory intelligence, executive functions, VERBAL-LEARNING TEST, COGNITIVE PERFORMANCE, LOBE LESIONS, GENERAL INTELLIGENCE, RECOGNITION MEMORY, EPISODIC MEMORY, DAMAGE, CORTEX, AGE, INHIBITION
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10055914
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