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Similar effect of intermittent theta burst and sham stimulation on corticospinal excitability: a 5-day repeated sessions study

Perellón-Alfonso, R; Kralik, M; Pileckyte, I; Princic, M; Bon, J; Matzhold, C; Fischer, B; ... Kojovic, M; + view all (2018) Similar effect of intermittent theta burst and sham stimulation on corticospinal excitability: a 5-day repeated sessions study. European Journal of Neuroscience , 48 (4) pp. 1990-2000. 10.1111/ejn.14077. Green open access

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Abstract

Despite accumulating evidence of inter- and intra-individual variability in response to theta burst stimulation, it is widely believed that in therapeutic applications, repeated sessions can have a "build-up" effect that increases the response over and above that seen in a single session. However, strong evidence for this is lacking. Therefore, we examined whether daily administration of intermittent theta burst stimulation (iTBS) over the primary motor cortex induces cumulative changes in transcranial magnetic stimulation measures of cortical excitability, above the changes induced by sham stimulation. Over 5 consecutive days, 20 healthy participants received either active iTBS or sham stimulation. Each day, baseline measures of cortical excitability were assessed before and up to 30 min after the intervention. There was no significant difference in the rate of response between iTBS and sham stimulation on any of the 5 days. There was no iTBS specific cumulative increase of corticospinal excitability. The likelihood that an individual would remain a responder from day-to-day was low in both groups, implying high within-subject variability of both active and sham iTBS after-effects. In contrast, we found a high within-subject repeatability of resting and active motor threshold, and baseline motor evoked potential amplitude. In summary, sham stimulation has similar effect to active iTBS on corticospinal excitability, even when applied repeatedly for 5 days. Our results might be relevant to research and clinical applications of theta burst stimulation protocols. This article is protected by copyright.

Type: Article
Title: Similar effect of intermittent theta burst and sham stimulation on corticospinal excitability: a 5-day repeated sessions study
Location: France
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/ejn.14077
Publisher version: http://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.14077
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: motor cortex, plasticity, transcranial magnetic stimulation, variability
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10054013
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