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High frequency peripheral vibration decreases completion time on a number of motor tasks

Macerollo, A; Palmer, C; Foltynie, T; Korlipara, P; Limousin, P; Edwards, M; Kilner, JM; (2018) High frequency peripheral vibration decreases completion time on a number of motor tasks. European Journal of Neuroscience , 48 (2) pp. 1789-1802. 10.1111/ejn.14050. Green open access

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Abstract

A recent theoretical account of motor control proposes that modulation of afferent information plays a role in affecting how readily we can move. Increasing the estimate of uncertainty surrounding the afferent input is a necessary step in being able to move. It has been proposed that an inability to modulate the gain of this sensory information underlies the cardinal symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). We aimed to test this theory by modulating the uncertainty of the proprioceptive signal using high frequency peripheral vibration, to determine the subsequent effect on motor performance.We investigated if this peripheral stimulus might modulate oscillatory activity over the sensorimotor cortex in order to understand the mechanism by which peripheral vibration can change motor performance.We found that 80Hz peripheral vibration applied to the right wrist of a total of 54healthy human participants reproducibly improved performance across 4 separate randomized experiments on a number of motor control tasks (nine hole-peg task, box and block test, reaction time task and finger tapping).Improved performance on all motor tasks (except the amplitude of finger tapping) was also seen for a sample of 18PD patients ON medication.EEG data investigating the effect of vibration on oscillatory activity revealed a significant decrease in beta power(15-30Hz) over the contralateral sensorimotor cortex at the onset and offset of 80Hz vibration.This finding is consistent with a novel theoretical account of motor initiation, namely that modulating uncertainty of the proprioceptive afferent signal improves motor performance potentially by gating the incoming sensory signal and allowing for top-down proprioceptive predictions. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: High frequency peripheral vibration decreases completion time on a number of motor tasks
Location: France
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1111/ejn.14050
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/ejn.14050
Language: English
Additional information: This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
Keywords: Parkinson's disease, bradykinesia, motor performance, vibration
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > UCL Queen Square Institute of Neurology > Clinical and Movement Neurosciences
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10053175
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