UCL logo

UCL Discovery

UCL home » Library Services » Electronic resources » UCL Discovery

Would changing the selection process for GP trainees stem the workforce crisis? A cohort study using multiple-imputation and simulation

Taylor, C; McManus, IC; Davison, I; (2018) Would changing the selection process for GP trainees stem the workforce crisis? A cohort study using multiple-imputation and simulation. BMC Medical Education , 18 (1) , Article 81. 10.1186/s12909-018-1160-z. Green open access

[img]
Preview
Text
2018-BMC_MedEd-ModellingOfGPselection-TaylorAndDavison.pdf - ["content_typename_Published version" not defined]

Download (534kB) | Preview

Abstract

BACKGROUND: There is currently a shortage of qualified GPs in the UK and not all of the training posts available each year are filled. Changing the way in which GP trainees are selected could help increase the training post fill rate and the number of new entrants to the GP Register. The aim of this study was to model the impact of changing the selection process for GP training on the number of trainees obtaining GP Registration, either with or without extensions. METHOD: This was a cohort study using UK applications for GP training in 2011-14. Application data were linked using GMC numbers to training outcome data where available, and imputed using multiple imputation where missing. The number of trainees appointed and GP Registrations within three and five years' full-time-equivalent were estimated for four different selection processes. RESULTS: The cut scores used in the actual 2015 selection process makes it impossible to fill all training posts. Random selection is the worst option, but the difference between this and other processes modelled falls as more trainees are selected. There are large marginal effects on outcomes: those with the highest selection scores are more likely to obtain GP Registration than those with the lowest scores. CONCLUSIONS: Changing the selection process alone would have a small impact on the number of GP Registrations; reducing/removing cut scores would have a much larger impact. This would also increase the number of trainees requiring extensions and being released from training which would have adverse consequences for the profession.

Type: Article
Title: Would changing the selection process for GP trainees stem the workforce crisis? A cohort study using multiple-imputation and simulation
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1186/s12909-018-1160-z
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1186/s12909-018-1160-z
Language: English
Additional information: This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.
Keywords: General practice, Multiple imputation, Recruitment, Selection, Training
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10048169
Downloads since deposit
146Downloads
Download activity - last month
Download activity - last 12 months
Downloads by country - last 12 months

Archive Staff Only

View Item View Item