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Physically Active Lessons Improve Lesson Activity and On-Task Behavior: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of the "Virtual Traveller" Intervention

Norris, E; Dunsmuir, S; Duke-Williams, O; Stamatakis, E; Shelton, N; (2018) Physically Active Lessons Improve Lesson Activity and On-Task Behavior: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of the "Virtual Traveller" Intervention. Health Education & Behavior 10.1177/1090198118762106. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Physically active lessons have not often been assessed with randomized controlled trials. AIMS: Evaluate the effects of the "Virtual Traveller" (VT) intervention delivered using classroom interactive whiteboards on physical activity, on-task behavior, and student engagement. METHODS: Participants were 219 children aged 8 to 9 years from 10 schools in Greater London, assessed in a cluster-randomized controlled trial between March 2015 and May 2016. For 6 weeks, intervention children received 10-minute VT sessions three times a week during math and English lessons (VT group: n = 113). Children in control schools received regular teaching (COM group: n = 106). Outcomes were school-day, weekend-day, and lesson-time sedentary behavior (SB), light physical activity (LPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA), and on-task behavior and student engagement, assessed at baseline (T0), 2 weeks (T1), and 4 weeks (T2) during the VT intervention and 1 week (T3) and 3 months (T4) postintervention using multilevel modeling. RESULTS: VT pupils engaged in significantly more school-day MVPA at T1 only, with no other significant differences between groups in overall school-day or weekend-day activity. VT pupils engaged in significantly less SB and more MVPA during lesson time than COM pupils. More on-task behavior was shown in VT pupils than COM pupils but there was no difference in student engagement. DISCUSSION: VT reduced sedentary behavior and increased physical activity during lesson time but not across overall school or weekend days. VT improved on-task behavior but had no effect on student engagement. CONCLUSION: Physical activity can be integrated into teaching using interactive whiteboards with no detriment to educational outcomes.

Type: Article
Title: Physically Active Lessons Improve Lesson Activity and On-Task Behavior: A Cluster-Randomized Controlled Trial of the "Virtual Traveller" Intervention
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1177/1090198118762106
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1177/1090198118762106
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: intervention, on-task behavior, physical activity/exercise, physically active lessons, school-based health care, student engagement
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10046745
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