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Brain metabolic sensing and metabolic signaling at the level of an astrocyte

Marina, N; Turovsky, E; Christie, IN; Hosford, PS; Hadjihambi, A; Korsak, A; Ang, R; ... Gourine, AV; + view all (2017) Brain metabolic sensing and metabolic signaling at the level of an astrocyte. Glia 10.1002/glia.23283. (In press). Green open access

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Abstract

Astrocytes support neuronal function by providing essential structural and nutritional support, neurotransmitter trafficking and recycling and may also contribute to brain information processing. In this article we review published results and report new data suggesting that astrocytes function as versatile metabolic sensors of central nervous system (CNS) milieu and play an important role in the maintenance of brain metabolic homeostasis. We discuss anatomical and functional features of astrocytes that allow them to detect and respond to changes in the brain parenchymal levels of metabolic substrates (oxygen and glucose), and metabolic waste products (carbon dioxide). We report data suggesting that astrocytes are also sensitive to circulating endocrine signals-hormones like ghrelin, glucagon-like peptide-1 and leptin, that have a major impact on the CNS mechanisms controlling food intake and energy balance. We discuss signaling mechanisms that mediate communication between astrocytes and neurons and consider how these mechanisms are recruited by astrocytes activated in response to various metabolic challenges. We review experimental data suggesting that astrocytes modulate the activities of the respiratory and autonomic neuronal networks that ensure adaptive changes in breathing and sympathetic drive in order to support the physiological and behavioral demands of the organism in ever-changing environmental conditions. Finally, we discuss evidence suggesting that altered astroglial function may contribute to the pathogenesis of disparate neurological, respiratory and cardiovascular disorders such as Rett syndrome and systemic arterial hypertension.

Type: Article
Title: Brain metabolic sensing and metabolic signaling at the level of an astrocyte
Location: United States
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1002/glia.23283
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1002/glia.23283
Language: English
Additional information: This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in the credit line; if the material is not included under the Creative Commons license, users will need to obtain permission from the license holder to reproduce the material. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
Keywords: Brainstem, breathing, chemoreception, food intake, gut hormone, metabolism
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Life Sciences > Div of Biosciences > Neuro, Physiology and Pharmacology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Div of Medicine
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10041117
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