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Tertiary Lymphoid Structures in Cancer: Drivers of Antitumor immunity, immunosuppression, or Bystander Sentinels in Disease?

Colbeck, EJ; Ager, A; Gallimore, A; Jones, GW; (2017) Tertiary Lymphoid Structures in Cancer: Drivers of Antitumor immunity, immunosuppression, or Bystander Sentinels in Disease? Frontiers in Immunology , 8 (ARTN 183) , Article 1830. 10.3389/fimmu.2017.01830. Green open access

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Abstract

Secondary lymphoid organs are integral to initiation and execution of adaptive immune responses. These organs provide a setting for interactions between antigen-specific lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells recruited from local infected or inflamed tissues. Secondary lymphoid organs develop as a part of a genetically preprogrammed process during embryogenesis. However, organogenesis of secondary lymphoid tissues can also be recapitulated in adulthood during de novo lymphoid neogenesis of tertiary lymphoid structures (TLSs). These ectopic lymphoid-like structures form in the inflamed tissues afflicted by various pathological conditions, including cancer, autoimmunity, infection, or allograft rejection. Studies are beginning to shed light on the function of such structures in different disease settings, raising important questions regarding their contribution to progression or resolution of disease. Data show an association between the tumor-associated TLSs and a favorable prognosis in various types of human cancer, attracting the speculation that TLSs support effective local antitumor immune responses. However, definitive evidence for the role for TLSs in fostering immune responses in vivo are lacking, with current data remaining largely correlative by nature. In fact, some more recent studies have even demonstrated an immunosuppressive, tumor-promoting role for cancer-associated TLSs. In this review, we will discuss what is known about the development of cancer-associated TLSs and the current understanding of their potential role in the antitumor immune response.

Type: Article
Title: Tertiary Lymphoid Structures in Cancer: Drivers of Antitumor immunity, immunosuppression, or Bystander Sentinels in Disease?
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.3389/fimmu.2017.01830
Publisher version: http://dx.doi.org/10.3389/fimmu.2017.01830
Language: English
Additional information: © 2017 Colbeck, Ager, Gallimore and Jones. This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (CC BY). The use, distribution or reproduction in other forums is permitted, provided the original author(s) or licensor are credited and that the original publication in this journal is cited, in accordance with accepted academic practice. No use, distribution or reproduction is permitted which does not comply with these terms.
Keywords: Science & Technology, Life Sciences & Biomedicine, Immunology, tertiary lymphoid structures, cancer immunotherapy, high endothelial venules, lymphoid neogenesis, tumor microenvironment, REGULATORY T-CELLS, HIGH ENDOTHELIAL VENULES, LYMPHOTOXIN-BETA-RECEPTOR, TISSUE-INDUCER CELLS, TUMOR-INFILTRATING LYMPHOCYTES, MATURE DENDRITIC CELLS, PRIMARY CUTANEOUS MELANOMA, NODE-LIKE STRUCTURES, HUMAN LUNG-CANCER, BREAST-CANCER
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Medical Sciences > Cancer Institute > Research Department of Oncology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10040843
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