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Communication of behaviour change interventions: Can they be recognised from written descriptions?

Johnston, M; Johnston, D; Wood, CE; Hardeman, W; Francis, J; Michie, S; (2018) Communication of behaviour change interventions: Can they be recognised from written descriptions? Psychology & Health , 33 (6) pp. 713-723. 10.1080/08870446.2017.1385784. Green open access

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Communication of the content of a behaviour change intervention (BCI) involves clear description followed by appropriate recognition and interpretation. We investigated accuracy of recognition of BCI descriptions and the effects of training in the behaviour change taxonomy BCTTv1. METHODS: Materials were 166 written descriptions of two BCIs previously written by 166 separate writers after viewing a video of the BCI. Each of the current participants (12 naïve and 12 trained in BCTTv1) was presented with a random sample of the written descriptions and asked to form groups of descriptions they judged to be describing the same intervention. For each participant, we assessed the number of groupings of BCI descriptions, their purity (containing only one BCI) and their differentiation (having a dominant BCI). RESULTS: All except one participant classified the descriptions into more than two groupings. Naïve participants created significantly more groupings, fewer 'pure' groupings and less differentiated groupings (all Mann-Whitney p < .05). CONCLUSIONS: Written communications of BCI contents may not be recognised and interpreted adequately to support implementation. BCT taxonomy training may lead to some progress in interpreting the active content of interventions but, based on this limited study, further progress is needed if BCIs for accurate implementation.

Type: Article
Title: Communication of behaviour change interventions: Can they be recognised from written descriptions?
Location: England
Open access status: An open access version is available from UCL Discovery
DOI: 10.1080/08870446.2017.1385784
Publisher version: https://doi.org/10.1080/08870446.2017.1385784
Language: English
Additional information: This version is the author accepted manuscript. For information on re-use, please refer to the publisher’s terms and conditions.
Keywords: BCTTv1, behaviour change interventions, behaviour change techniques, communication, implementation
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > School of Life and Medical Sciences > Faculty of Brain Sciences > Div of Psychology and Lang Sciences > Clinical, Edu and Hlth Psychology
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL BEAMS > Faculty of Maths and Physical Sciences > Inst for Risk and Disaster Reduction
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10032896
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