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Archaeobotanical evidence for the spread of farming in the eastern Mediterranean

Colledge, S; Conolly, J; Sherman, S; (2004) Archaeobotanical evidence for the spread of farming in the eastern Mediterranean. Current Anthropology , 45 (4 SUPPL.)

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Abstract

A major topic of debate in Old World prehistory is the relative importance of population movement versus cultural diffusion in explaining the spread of agriculture into and across Europe following its inception in southwestern Asia. An important set of data that has surprisingly been largely absent from this debate is the preserved crops and associated weeds of the earliest farmers. An analysis of archaeobotanical data from 40 aceramic Neolithic sites in southwestern Asia and southeastern Europe shows that there are vegetational signatures that characterize the different geographical regions occupied by the Early Neolithic farmers. On this basis it is argued that the compositional similarities of the crop package between the Levantine core, Cyprus, and Greece are indicative of both the routes of migration of early farming groups and the early agricultural practices of Europe's first farmers. © 2004 by The Wenner-Gren Foundation for Anthropological Research. All rights reserved.

Type: Article
Title: Archaeobotanical evidence for the spread of farming in the eastern Mediterranean
UCL classification: UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH
UCL > Provost and Vice Provost Offices > UCL SLASH > Faculty of SandHS > Institute of Archaeology
URI: http://discovery.ucl.ac.uk/id/eprint/10028421
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